Our Mission and Vision

Mission:

To help veterans and first responders with ADHD1 and other learning disabilities, as well as a range of emotional and cognitive brain-based disorders, identify, understand, and successfully manage their conditions. We work with those afflicted, along with their families, friends and employers, to develop and implement personalized plans for success, to improve their quality of life and productivity, to restore their confidence and dignity, and to help them become fully engaged in their community.

Vision:

All adults with learning disabilities, and facing any other challenges, can lead happy, productive lives, with confidence and dignity, achieve their personal goals, and reach their fullest potential.

Our Heroes Network’s Values:
• Empowerment – the desire to manage one’s own affairs
• Fairness – all people, at any level of ability, are treated the same
• Healthy living – the state of being bodily and mentally vigorous
• Advocacy – actively supporting those afflicted with ADHD and other learning disabilities

Issue:

ADHD and undiagnosed ADHD have reached epidemic proportions for families and employers in the US2. The estimated economic impact was a negative $31.6 billion annually3. It is estimated that 62 percent of veterans4 and first responders suffer from ADHD, and according to NIH,5 go undiagnosed6. ADHD is easily treatable, but undiagnosed ADHD often leads to alcoholism, drug abuse, divorce and other destructive behavior7.

 


[1] Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

2 ADHD is best understood as a cultural construct, S Timimi, E Taylor – The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2004 – RCP 3 Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity disorder Among Homeless Veterans, Ben Lomas, M.D., Peter S. Gartside, M.S.. Ph.d.

3 A review of the economic burden of ADHD, Louis S Matza, Clark Paramore and Manishi Prasad

4 Attention-Deficit hyperactivity Disorder Among Homeless Veterans, Ben Lomas, MD., Peter S. Gartside, M.S., PH.D.

5 National Institutes of Health

6 ADHD Often Undiagnosed in Adults , JAMA. 2003;290(12):1565-1567. doi:10.1001/jama.290.12.1565.

7 Costs of attention deficit–hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the US: excess costs of persons with ADHD and their family members in 2000, 2005, Vol. 21, No. 2 , Pages 195-205

 

 

 

 


[1] Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 2 ADHD is best understood as a cultural construct, S Timimi, E Taylor – The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2004 – RCP 3 Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity disorder Among Homeless Veterans, Ben Lomas, M.D., Peter S. Gartside, M.S.. Ph.d. 3 A review of the economic burden of ADHDLouis S Matza, Clark Paramore and Manishi Prasad 4 Attention-Deficit hyperactivity Disorder Among Homeless Veterans, Ben Lomas, MD., Peter S. Gartside, M.S., PH.D. National Institutes of Health 6 ADHD Often Undiagnosed in Adults , JAMA. 2003;290(12):1565-1567. doi:10.1001/jama.290.12.1565. 7 Costs of attention deficit–hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the US: excess costs of persons with ADHD and their family members in 2000, 2005, Vol. 21, No. 2 , Pages 195-205

   

Issue Statement

Issue:

ADHD1 and undiagnosed ADHD have reached epidemic proportions for families and employers in the US2. The estimated economic impact was a negative $31.6 billion annually3. It is estimated that 62 percent of veterans4 and first responders suffer from ADHD, and according to NIH,5 go undiagnosed6. ADHD is easily treatable, but undiagnosed ADHD often leads to alcoholism, drug abuse, divorce and other destructive behavior7.

 

[1] Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

2 ADHD is best understood as a cultural construct, S Timimi, E Taylor – The British Journal of Psychiatry, 2004 – RCP 3 Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity disorder Among Homeless Veterans, Ben Lomas, M.D., Peter S. Gartside, M.S.. Ph.d.

3 A review of the economic burden of ADHDLouis S Matza, Clark Paramore and Manishi Prasad

4 Attention-Deficit hyperactivity Disorder Among Homeless Veterans, Ben Lomas, MD., Peter S. Gartside, M.S., PH.D.

National Institutes of Health

6 ADHD Often Undiagnosed in Adults , JAMA. 2003;290(12):1565-1567. doi:10.1001/jama.290.12.1565.

7 Costs of attention deficit–hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the US: excess costs of persons with ADHD and their family members in 2000, 2005, Vol. 21, No. 2 , Pages 195-205